Can i give keppra an hour early to my dog



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Can i give keppra an hour early to my dog?

I think the most appropriate thing for you to do is have a discussion with your veterinarian about your particular situation and try to come up with a compromise. You could discuss the following:

1. Can you give Keppra an hour or two early in the morning or at the end of a normal day, as long as you do not miss doses?2. If you do miss a dose, can you take it later in the day? If you miss 2 or 3 doses, are you concerned about being able to get to a veterinary clinic?3. If you do not want to go to a clinic, is it possible to do a sublingual dose if you do not have access to a vet? You could always just make your own syringe to administer a shot sublingually.

I also suggest that you have your own copy of the prescription that you can give yourself. You could also keep a copy of your prescription in your home to have on hand at all times.

Re: I think the most appropriate thing for you to do is have a discussion with your veterinarian about your particular situation and try to come up with a compromise. You could discuss the following:

1. Can you give Keppra an hour or two early in the morning or at the end of a normal day, as long as you do not miss doses?2. If you do miss a dose, can you take it later in the day? If you miss 2 or 3 doses, are you concerned about being able to get to a veterinary clinic?3. If you do not want to go to a clinic, is it possible to do a sublingual dose if you do not have access to a vet? You could always just make your own syringe to administer a shot sublingually.

I also suggest that you have your own copy of the prescription that you can give yourself. You could also keep a copy of your prescription in your home to have on hand at all times.

I second this suggestion. Having your own copy of the prescription and syringe to administer it is a good idea.

When you ask your vet to take it early in the morning, he or she is probably going to say no. As soon as you start missing doses, that's a problem. And if you ask to take it later in the day, he or she is going to say no. The purpose of Keppra is to be taken at a certn time to control seizures, and it works best if it's taken as close to that time as possible. It will definitely cause your seizures to increase, so it may be a matter of trying to find the right amount of time where the dose doesn't start to lose its effectiveness.

As a general rule, we don't like to give a drug like Keppra that you have to take at a certn time early in the morning (except if you are sick and it's really important to start your treatment early). There are a few reasons for this:

1. We don't want to cause a problem with your sleep cycle. As I mentioned, Keppra will definitely have a stimulant effect. If your body starts reacting to the drug in a way that is interfering with your sleep patterns, this can be extremely problematic. It can also affect how you feel in the morning, which can be a big problem if you're driving and you're feeling tired.

2. We don't want to confuse your body about the time of day. Most drugs that you take at a specific time in the morning are usually timed to coincide with the sleep cycle of your body. If you start taking a drug at a different time in the morning, your body is going to have to adjust to a new routine. Your body will think that it's always time to sleep in the morning and you'll find that you are not getting sleepy or going to bed in the appropriate hours. You also run the risk of having seizures at random times during the day, which can be very frightening for you and your family.

I think that you're going to have a tough time getting any sort of an answer from your vet. He or she might be willing to consider giving it an hour or two early in the morning, but not at the end of the day.

I would suggest talking to your vet about it. Ask him or her to give you some general guidelines. This is going to be something that you need to think about and decide for yourself, but you will be able to determine what is best for your dog's seizure control based on this information.

It is important that you give Keppra at the same time every day. If you skip doses or give it an hour early, the seizure control is going to be significantly reduced.

If you are not able to give it an hour early in the morning, it may be worth considering the sublingual form. This is not a cure-all, but if you can get it into your dog's system, it will help. You'll still have to be willing to give it to your dog on a regular basis to be effective, but it will definitely give you more control over when your dog is given the drug.

I second this suggestion. Having your own copy of the prescription and syringe to administer it is a good idea.

When you ask your vet to take it early in the morning, he or she is probably going to say no. As soon as you start missing doses, that's a problem. And if you ask to take it later in the day, he or she is going to say no. The purpose of Keppra is to be taken at a certn time to control seizures, and it works best if it's taken as close to that time as possible. It will definitely cause your seizures to increase, so it may be a matter of trying to find the right amount of time where the dose doesn't start to lose its effectiveness.

As a general rule, we don't like to give a drug like Keppra that you have to take at a certn time early in the morning (except if you are sick and it's really important to start your treatment early). There are a few reasons


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